How To Resign From A Job

Published: 10 Jan 2018

How to resign

This is one of the most dreaded and most sensitive aspects of moving jobs. The point where you’ve accepted a new role and need to perform the dreaded task of informing your current employer of your decision. It’s nerve-wracking and truthfully you never know how your boss is going to react! We’ve come up with our top tips to ensure you leave as graciously as possible:

Act formally and professionally

Even if you haven’t been used to a formal working environment, it’s imperative that you act with the utmost professionalism when resigning. As we’ve eluded to, generally this is one of the most delicate scenarios on the jobseeker journey, so it’s important that you play by the book as much as possible.

Get it in writing and give notice

Always have a written version of your resignation ready to hand to your manager. Your notice period will be detailed in your contract; remember this and include it in your resignation letter. It’s amazing how many people forget that they’ve agreed to a notice period, although, by the point of resignation you should already know this as you’ll have had to provide this to your new employer during the interview process.

Tell your boss in person

This may not be the most comfortable scenario, but it must be done. You don’t need to burn any bridges just because you’re leaving. People leave jobs all the time so bear this in mind; what you’re doing is a very normal aspect of business and, indeed, life. Give your employer the respect that they deserve with a face-to-face meeting. Finding out from somebody else or telling them over the phone is never going to go down very well and could make your notice period very awkward.

What to say to your boss

Remember to be positive and resign with all dignity intact. Even if you’ve had the most horrendous time working for the company, this is not the time or place for an outburst. Talk about how much the company has benefitted you and simply explain that it is just your time to move on. You don’t need to go into too much detail if you don’t want to.

Act with sensitivity

This can be challenging, especially if you’re part of a small organisation where you naturally discuss feelings with your colleagues, but try to be considerate. Don’t tell anyone of your decision until you’ve formally resigned. Even though people might have cottoned onto the possibility that you might be leaving, don’t confirm anything. Tell them once you’ve had all the important discussions you need to have first.

Don’t be negative

There is no need for negativity at this stage. You’ve already made the decision to leave, so even if it’s on bad terms you don’t need to make it any worse. Hopefully your experience was a positive one, so enjoy the last few weeks of work with your colleagues. If not, it’s crucial to behave with grace and pride.

Don’t slack off

You may have handed your notice in, but for as long as your notice period stipulates, you are still paid to do your job with your current company. This time is key, especially if you’re looking for a good reference, plus, it’s just good manners to continue to work hard during your notice period. Make sure you leave your role in the best way possible. This might include creating handover documents or simply tidying up your folders and preparing for your replacement if there’s going to be one.

Have a slice of cake

You’ve got to treat yourself sometimes, right?

resigning diagram

It's not fun, but for most people, handing their notice in goes without a hitch. Life is a web of twists and turns and you’re going to experience nothing if you don’t take a few risks every once in a while. You might have come across this article because you’re curious about leaving your current job but you haven’t done anything about it yet. We’ve got shed loads of advice on how to know when to leave your job and how to find the right marketing job for you. We also have plenty of resources to help you with the application and interview process so make sure you check out our careers advice section. Your new marketing job could be just around the corner! 

 

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