How To Accept A Job Offer

Published: 17 Jan 2018

how to accept a job offer

There’s probably no better feeling than getting a call with good news to tell you that you’ve got the job! All your hard work has paid off; the research, the rounds of interviews, the interview tasks. It can be tempting to jump in and give a big fat yes in the first instance, but it’s really important that you consider all corners of the offer before you make a decision. We’ve compiled our top tips on what we think you should do at this stage of the jobseeker journey:

 

Ask questions

Do you know everything there is to know about the role that you’ve been offered? Do you understand the culture? Are you aware of all the benefits and options available to you? Before you give them a yes (or a no!), think of everything that you want to know about this opportunity. If you can answer every question, great! But if you can’t, get your answers before you make a final decision.

 

Don’t rush it but don’t leave it too long either

Accepting a job offer is something that should be considered with great care. Accepting on the spot shows a lack of thought on your part. It’s important to be thorough and make a strong decision. Equally, job offers don’t stay on the table for very long, so don’t ignore it for days on end. Your prospective employer might not feel you’re truly interested in the opportunity either, so this can work against you. Find out everything you need to know as quickly as possible and then extend your acceptance.

 

Say thank you

Regardless of whether you decide to accept it or not, make sure you send an email to say thank you for the offer. This also gives you the opportunity to set up a call or meeting to discuss the offer in more detail and to ask all of your qualifying questions.

 

Negotiate your salary

If the job you’re applying for didn’t outline a specific figure in terms of the salary on offer, then a negotiation may need to take place. Good internal recruiters and recruitment consultants will qualify your expectations early in the process but there are times when this does not come to light until offer stage. It’s important to remember that your salary is unlikely to change for a year in a your new role so you must be happy with it. For more information check out our latest advice on how to negotiate your salary during the offer process.

 

Work out any special conditions

For example, if you have a holiday booked it is acceptable to defer your start date. Similarly, there may be other reasons why you might need a little longer. Use this period to establish these details to ensure a smooth transition into your new role. You might have been sold the role on the promise of regular flexible working; now is the time to put these in place to avoid any awkward or unnecessary conversations once you’ve started.

 

Acceptance letter or email

Whether you send a letter or an email is down to personal preference; either are fine. Once you’ve got the offer you were looking for and you’re happy to accept, you can start to craft your official acceptance. Remember that you’re still making a good impression so convey your excitement for starting. Include all the key details of the terms of your employment such as your new salary, benefits and any special conditions. Express gratitude if your new employer has put any exceptions in place for you. It is very important that you proofread your official acceptance before you send it and that you’re happy with all the details you’re about to finalise.

 

Get everything in writing

A verbal offer means nothing legally and it could leave you in a sticky situation if things change. Make sure you get a copy of this in writing and save all communications you’ve had over email and through letters. Not only is this crucial from a legal standpoint, but it’s good for your reference and understanding in what to expect from your new role.

how to accept a job offer

 

Accept your job offer the right way and make a perfect first impression. If you're now wondering how to handle those first day nerves, check out this brilliant little cheatsheet. If you didn't accept the role and you're back to the drawing board, why not start by browsing marketing jobs on the OnlyMarketingJobs.com website? Go for it and enjoy! 

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